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The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government

 
NYS ConCon 2017

BLOGS




When Misinformation Spirals Out of Control: The Case of a “Rigged” Constitutional Convention Process in New York State


By Heather Trela
August 2017

As the vote to decide whether to convene a constitutional convention in New York State approaches, more information about the process for, and impact of, a potential convention is circulating. Unfortunately, not all the information that is being shared is true or accurate. In a new blog post, Rockefeller Institute Chief of Staff Heather Trela examines the claim, widely spread on Facebook, that the ballot has been rigged in favor of convening a constitutional convention. This is the latest in a series of posts by the Institute on topics related to a potential constitutional convention.


When Rhetoric Attempts to Trump Reality: Why A Constitutional Convention Would Not Take Away Public Employee Rights


By Peter J. Galie and Christopher Bopst
August 2017

One of the arguments frequently levied against a constitutional convention in New York State is that a convention could endanger public-sector pensions and the right to organize and bargain collectively. In a new blog post, guest writers Peter Galie and Christopher Bopst examine what rights the state constitution affords public employees and why they believe a constitutional convention is more likely to enhance public employee rights than diminish them.



Amending New York’s Constitution, In Between Conventions


People to Vote on Changes to the Constitution’s “Forever Wild” Clause This Fall
By Jessica Ottney Mahar
August 2017

While New York State voters will have the chance this November to decide whether a state constitutional convention should be convened, also on the ballot will be a measure to amend the “Forever Wild” clause of the state constitution. A new blog post by guest writer Jessica Ottney Mahar examines the alternative process for constitutional change in New York State that does not require a constitutional convention.



A $300 Million Error: When a Mistake Became an Alternative Fact to Oppose a Constitutional Convention


By Peter J. Galie and Christopher Bopst
July 2017

On the ballot this November, New York State voters have the opportunity to decide whether a state constitutional convention should be convened. A frequent argument against holding a convention is that it would cost too much. In a new blog post, Peter Galie and Christopher Bopst examine a popular misconception about the actual price tag of holding a convention.



“The Risks Outweigh the Rewards”: Who Are the Opponents of a Constitutional Convention and What Are Their Arguments?


By David Siracuse
July 2017

This November, New Yorkers will have a chance to vote for or against a state constitutional convention on the ballot. A diverse collection of nearly 100 organizations have come out against a constitutional convention. In a new blog post, Rockefeller Institute Special Assistant David Siracuse explores this oppositional coalition and their arguments for not supporting a constitutional convention.



Not the “Same Old Same Old Politics as Usual”: Why Insiders Won’t Dominate a Constitutional Convention


By Peter J. Galie and Christopher Bopst
June 2017

Every 20 years, voters in New York State are provided the opportunity to decide whether a state constitutional convention should be convened. This November, the chance to call a constitutional convention will once again appear on the ballot. In a new blog post, Peter Galie and Christopher Bopst address some of the arguments critics have made against holding a constitutional convention.



Why New York Needs a Constitutional Convention


By Peter J. Galie and Christopher Bopst
May 2017

Every 20 years, voters in New York State are provided the opportunity to decide whether a state constitutional convention should be convened. This November, the chance to call a constitutional convention will once again appear on the ballot. In a new blog post, Peter Galie and Christopher Bopst outline why they support a constitutional convention and believe it is the only way to achieve solutions to the state’s systemic problems.